Mysteries Categories

MYSTERY CATEGORIES
*Only for straight mysteries - Urban Fantasy that has mystery will not be included. Gothics get their own section, but not all Gothics are included since not all are mysteries, and is mainly Barbara Michaels types.*


The Golden Age of Detective Fiction was an era of classic murder mystery novels of similar patterns and styles, predominantly in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Allingham, Christie, Marsh and Sayers are often described as the "Queens of Crime". They are an form of "cozy novels", also called "soft-boiled novels." Characters are usually from middle and upper class. False leads and red herrings are used. Characters are not usually too rich psychologically, with the clues and methods of the crime and story being at the forefront for the sake of plot and puzzle over characterization. Slang and swearing is generally not used, as in the regular cozies. For the Golden Age, the time period is usually from the 20s to 40s and can be established in any country. Note that a lot of people combine Cozies and Golden Age - to me they don't have the same feel and read to them, despite teapots popping up ;)





Hardboiled (or hard-boiled) fiction is a literary genre that shares some of its characters and settings with crime fiction (especially detective stories). ... Rendered cynical by this cycle of violence, the detectives of hardboiled fiction are often antiheroes. Also included are Private Eye novels. Characters are usually from the working class.  Often the detective is the loner who does not have close ties to many people, and they are usually not seeking money. Sometimes the detective is rebellious or at odds with others in society, including the police. A lot of times the villains or criminals have ties with organized crime or seedy organizations. Gritty language of the streets is usually incorporated in character exchanges.  Some of the most popular hard-boiled mystery writers are: Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Mickey Spillane, Ross Macdonald, Walter Mosley, Robert B. Parker, Sara Paretsky, Sue Grafton, James Lee Burke, and Michael Connelly. Not all Hardboiled are noir of course - but they are combined -Noir can be thought of with the mood being gritty, bleak and unforgiving.  The Hard Case line is included here.





Cozy mysteries, also referred to as "cozies", are a subgenre of crime fiction in which sex and violence are downplayed or treated humorously, and the crime and detection take place in a small, socially intimate community. Amateur Sleuth. Characters are usually from middle and upper class. False leads and red herrings are also used. Characters are not usually too rich psychologically, with the clues and methods of the crime and story being at the forefront of the story for the sake of plot over characterization. Slang and swearing is generally not used, as in the regular cozies. Included here are Caper mysteries, where amateur detectives and humor blend in serious crime but keeping it light and fun, a.k.a. "comic crime story." I'm including Capers with cozies because they're are similarities, although they could stand on their own too. Many cozies are also paranormal, which are included here.





The police procedural, or police crime drama, is a subgenre of detective fiction that attempts to convincingly depict the activities of a police force as they investigate crimes. Also included here is any suspense/thriller that is similar. Serial killers are the main focus. Rich and interesting characters are stronger in this type of mystery compared to cozies. Psychological mysteries are in this section.





Gothic mysteries may be considered by some to be a sub-genre of romance, but mystery is a strong driving force in most of them, with romance being in the background or an afterthought only. Mainly Barbara Michaels types are included here - V.C. Andrews, as an example, is more drama gothic than mystery and will not be included here. May or may not have paranormal elements.




Last Updated 1/7/2018